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Full text of "Celebrating the installation of Gary Leon Miller, April 20, 2012: Dare to soar"

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA WILMINGTON 




Dear UNCW Friends, 

We, the community of the University of North Carolina Wilmington, have gathered together to celebrate the legacy, 
mission and values of our institution. Since our university's founding 65 years ago, students, faculty and staff have 
championed our motto, Discere Aude, Dare to Learn. We are, first and foremost, an iristitution of Mgher learning, 
and all of our endeavors derive from that commitment. 

Our dedication to learning extends beyond our campus. UNCW is fully engaged as a community partiier, 
organized with a global focus, recognized for superb education and research cind committed to embracing 
diversity of human thought and expression. 

It is a great honor and privilege to serve as the Chaiicellor of the University of North Carolina Wilmington. 

I am profoundly grateful to the UNC Board of Governors, President Tom Ross and the UNCW Board of Trustees 

for the opportunity to lead the university during a transformational time in American higher education. 

The vision of our future implies an unusually large suite of challenges and possibilities. The changes we experience, 
and the choices we make, will be guided by our values, by our commitment to intellectvial discourse and discovery, 
by our dedication to creativity and innovation, and by our resolute promise to seek the future with optimism and 
confidence. UNCW will always Dare to Learn; going forward, we will also Dare to Soar. 

Thank you for your uivolvement in the life arid the future of the University of North Carolina Wilmington. 



Gary L. Miller 
Chancellor 



CHANCELLOR GARY LEON MILLER 




Dr. Miller is the fourth chancellor and seventh 
leader of the University of North Carolina Wilmington. 
He brings extensive academic and administrative 
experience to UNCW. His expertise incorporates the 
breadth and depth of American higher education, 
from his own learning experiences as a student at the 
College of William and Mary and as a faculty member 
at Mississippi State University, Weber State University 
and the University of Mississippi to his work as a 
Dean at the University of the Pacific and as Provost 
and Vice President of Academic Affairs and Research 
at Wichita State University. 

At UNCW, Dr. Miller is reaffirming important 
university values and building on nationally 
recognized academic and research programs. 
He is also promoting community partnerships, 
entrepreneurship and innovation as ways for 
the university to "Invent the Future." 

Dr. Miller, a Virginia native, holds bachelor's and 
master's degrees in biology from the College of 
William and Mary and a Ph.D. in biological sciences 



from Mississippi State University. He is an ecologist 
who has written more than 40 articles and essays about 
research and higher education, edited a scientific 
journal, and co-authored the fourth edition of Ecology, 
one of the most widely used scientific textbooks for 
that subject. 

Dr. Miller serves on the American Association of 
State Colleges and Universities (AASCU) Committee 
for Economic and Workforce Development. He also 
participated as a member of the task force that 
developed the student learning outcomes component 
of the Voluntary System of Accountability, a joint 
project of the Association of Public and Land-Grant 
Universities (APLU: formerly NASULGC) and the 
AASCU. He is a member of the National College 
and University Advisory Council of the Educational 
Testing Service (ETS). 

He is married to Georgia Nix Miller. They have three 
grown children and three grandchildren. 



ORDER OF THE PROCESSION 

Grand Marshal Gabriel G. Lugo, President of the Faculty Senate 

Frank J. Bongiorno, Medallion Bearer, 2011 Recipient of the Board of 
Governors Excellence in Teaching 

Denis G. Carter, Isaac Bear Bell Bearer, Member of the Order of Isaac Bear 

Board of Governors of the University of North Carolina 

Officers of the University of North Carolina 

Delegates from Colleges and Universities 

Board of Trustees of the University of North Carolina Wilmington 

THE UNIVERSITY PROCESSION 

Faculty 

Deans 

Vice Chancellors 

Provost 



THE PLATFORM PROCESSION 

Keith R. Fraser '13, President of the UNCW Student 
Government Association 

Sandra T. McClammy '03, Chair of the UNCW Alumni Association 

Amy N. Ramsey, Chair of the UNCW Staff Senate 

Michael J. Arnold '93, '99M, Senior Advisor for Policy, 
Office of the Governor 

Gary Blaine, Reverend Doctor, Wichita, Kansas 

W. Allen Cobb Jr., Senior Resident Superior Court Judge, 
Fifth Judicial District 

James R. Leutze, UNCW Chancellor Emeritus 

George M. Teague, Chair of the UNCW Board of Trustees 

Hannah D. Gage, Chair of the UNC Board of Governors 

Thomas W. Ross, President of the University of North Carolina 

Gary L. Miller, Chancellor of the Umversity of North Carolina Wilmington 







I 


INSTALLATION CEREMONY 




•i, ' 


Prelude 

The SiufLViiniis by Clifton Williams 

Vahires MarcJi bv Johannes Hanssen / arr. Bainum 

British Eighth Mmrh bv Zo Elliott / arr. Luckliardt 

UXCW Chamber Winds 

Conducted b\- John P. LaCognata 


Presiding 

Thomas W. Ross 

President, University of North Carolina 

Acknowledgement of Special Guests 

Thomas W. Ross 




Processional 

Procession ofXobles by Nicholas Rimsky-Korsakov / arr. Leidzen 
UXCW Chamber Winds 


Greetings 

Hannah D. Gage 

Chair, UNC Board of Governors 




Parade of Colors 

Eugene Ashley High School Na\'al Junior Reserve 
Officer Training Corps Color Guard 
The Star-Spaugled Banner 
Heather Bobeck '13 


George M. Teague 

Chair, UNCW Board of Trustees 

Gabriel G. Lugo 

President, UNCW Faculty Senate 




Welcome 

George M. Teague 

Chair, UXCW Board of Trustees 

Invocation 


Amy N. Ramsey 

Chair, UNCW Staff Senate 

Sandra T. McClammy '03 

Chair, UNCW Alumni Association 




Gar\- Blaine 

Re\erend Doctor, Wichita, Kansas 


Keith R.Fraser' 13 

President, UNCW Student Government Association 




Promise of Living by Aaron Copland 
UXCW Concert Choir and Chamber Winds 
Conducted by Joe E. Hickman 







Inaugural Song 

UNCW Alma Mater by Charles Hunnicutt, 
Lloyd Hudson / rev. Steven Errante, Cathy Albergo 
UNCW Concert Choir and Chamber Winds 
Conducted by Steven Errante 

Lyrics are located on the following page. 

Installation of the Chancellor 

Thomas W. Ross 



Ringing of the Bell 

Keith R. Eraser '13 

In recognition of the seven individuals who have led the 

University of North Carolina Wilmington 

Recessional 

Allegro Maestoso from Water Music Suite 
by George Erideric Handel / arr. Custer 
UNCW Chamber Winds 



Oath of Office 

The Honorable W. Allen Cobb Jr. 

Senior Resident Superior Court Judge, Fifth Judicial District 

Presentation of Medallion 

George M. Teague 

Address 

Gary Leon Miller 

Chancellor, University of North Carolina Wilmington 

Closing Remarks 

Thomas W. Ross 



The audience will remain in place during the recessional. 
Volunteers will direct guests to the picnic area on King Hall lawn. 








UNIVERSITY HISTORY AND TRADITION 

Former Leaders 

1947-49 
1949-58 
1958-68 
1968-90 
1990-03 
2003-11 



UNCW fJ^MA«_5^ATER 



T. T. Hamilton 
John T. Hoggard 
William M. Randall 
William H. Wagoner 
James R. Leutze 
Rosemars- DePaolo 



Hail we proudly sing to thee who guides our green and gold. 
Though future years may part us, fond memories we shall hold. 
For our hearts will cherish all your service done. 
All hail our alma mater praise thee, O Wilmington! 

Here we stand as one together voices raised in song. 
Our loyal hearts shall praise thee as God doth lead us on. 
Dare to learn and dare to soar, Seahawks brave and true. 
All hail our alma mater praise teal, gold and blue! 



Copyright 2012 by University of North Carolina Wilmington 




UNIVERSITY FACTS 

• 1947 - Wilmington College opened on September 4, 1947, 
to 238 students. 

• 1948 - Wilmington College was officially accredited by the 
North Carolina College Conference and became a member 
of the American Association of Junior Colleges. 

• 1952 - The institution was accredited as a junior college 
by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. 

• 1958 - New Hanover County voted to place the college 
under the Community College Act of the State of North 
Carolina, making it a part of the state system of higher 
education. Control passed from the New Hanover County 
Board of Education to a board of 12 trustees, eight of whom 
were appointed locally and four of whom were appointed 
by the governor of the state. Requirements for admission 
and graduation and the general academic standards of the 
college came under the supervision of the North Carolina 
Board of Higher Education, and the college began to receive 
an appropriation from the state for operating expenses in 
addition to local tax. 



1963 - By an act of the General Assembly of 
North Carolina, Wilmington College became a 
senior college with a four-year curriculum, authorized 
to offer the bachelor's degree. 

1968-69 - By vote of the Board of Trustees of the University 
of North Carolina, with subsequent approval by the North 
Carolina Board of Higher Education, and by an act of the 
General Assembly of North Carolina, Wilmington College 
became the University of North Carolina Wilmington. 

1977 - The Board of Governors of the University of North 
Carolina authorized the University of North Carolina 
Wilmington to offer its first graduate programs at the 
master's level. 

1985 - The Board of Governors elevated the University 
of North Carolina Wilmington to a Comprehensive 
Level I University. 



THE UNIVERSITY 



At tlie Uni\ersit\' ot Xortli Carolina Wilmington, passionate and 
engaged teaching, learning and research are paramount. UNCW 
is an active learning communit\' that uniquely combines a small- 
college commitnient to excellence in undergraduate teaching with 
a research unixersitv's opportimities for student involvement in 
significant faculty scholarship. The university's prestige has grown 
in recent \"ears, as has its population, which now includes more than 
13,000 students and more than 1,800 full-time staff and faculty, with 
more than 85.5 percent of our faculty holding terminal degrees. 

For 14 consecutive years, UNC Wilmington has been ranked among 
the top 10 public master's uni\'ersities in the South in the U.S.News 
and World Report "America's Best Colleges" guidebook. UNCW is 
ranked fourth in the 2012 edition and is tied for third among 46 
"up-and-coming" master's universities in the South. The university 
also received the "Best in the Southeast" designation for 2012 by 
Jlie Princeton Reviric, is included in the 2012 edition of the Fiske 
Guide to Colleges, and is on the G.I. Jobs magazine 2011 list of 
militar}' friendly schools. 

The university's academic units include the College of Arts and 
Sciences, the College of Health and Human Services, the Cameron 
School of Business, the Watson School of Education and the 
Graduate School. UXCW offers bachelor's degrees in 52 majors 
and 32 graduate degree programs, which include a Ph.D. in marine 



biology, one of only three offered on the East Coast, and an Ed.D. in 
educational leadership. 

The university has taken a leadership role in the long-term 
economic, environmental, educational, social and cultural health 
of the region. It has a strong commitment to adult learners and 
offers short, non-credit university courses, seminars, lectures, travel 
excursions and other educational opportunities. 

The campus has changed dramatically in the last 10 years with the 
construction or renovation of more than 40 buildings for academics, 
housing, athletics and campus life. Construction is underway for a 
teaching laboratory building for psychology, the expansion of the 
student recreation center and a marine biotechnology building at 
the Center for Marine Science. 

The UNCW Seahawks compete in the Colonial Athletic Association 
as an NCAA Division I program, fielding 19 intercollegiate teams. 
UNCW's athletes excel not only on the playing field but in the class- 
room as well. The university's student-athletes have consistently 
recorded high graduation rates among NCAA Division 1 public 
universities in North Carolina for the four-year class average. In 
2010-11, Seahawk teams captured four Colonial Athletic Association 
championships in men's and women's golf, men's swimming and 
diving and men's tennis. 



THE HOUSE LOGO 



UNIVERSITY COLORS 



The house logo was designed as part 

of the university's celebration of its 

40th anniversary in 1987 and updated 

during the tenure of Chancellor James 

R. Leutze. The design represents our 

distinctive and recognizable Georgian "~~~~"'~^"~~ 

architecture and symbolizes the character of the university. 



UNCW 



THE SEAHAWK 

According to brothers Gene and James 
Warren, who were members of the first 
student council at Wilmington College, the 
nickname "Seahawk" was selected in 1947. 
A five-man student council was convened to 
secure a nickname and school colors for the 
college's first athletic teams. As a result, the 
nickname "seahawks" was chosen because 
of the popularity of the Iowa Seahawks 
who were known for their excellent athletic 
teams and because of Wilmington College's 
proximity to the water. 




UNCW 



i® 



The university's original school colors of kelly green and yellow 
were also chosen in 1947 by a five-person student council. At the 
suggestion of instructor Emma Lawson, the group selected green 
and gold to represent the color of the ocean (green) and the nearby 
sandy beaches (gold). In late spring of 1992, Director of Athlet- 
ics Paul Miller added navy as a secondary color to provide more 
marketing options. The colors were modified to the current teal, 
gold and blue in 1995 with the introduction of a new athletic logo 
designed by local artist and businessman Gary Longordo. 

With the new shades representing the "green of the ocean and 
the gold of the sand with the blue of the deep ocean," the Student 
Government Association joined Chancellor Rosemary DePaolo 
and other university officials in unveiling the "Teal Declaration" 
in March 2009 on "Teal Day" to officially recognize teal as the 
primary school color. 



CLOCK TOWER 

The dock tower on the Campus Commons was a gift from the 
Class of 2000. The idea of erecting a clock tower was conceived 
and spearheaded by the 2000 senior class president, Shane Fernando 
The 50-foot clock tower was dedicated and sounded for the first 
time at the senior celebration on May 12, 2000. With its ability to 
plav a \arietv of songs such as the national anthem, the clock 
to^^■e^ is also a significant part of important institutional events 
and memorial programs. 



ISAAC BEAR BELL 

The Isaac Bear bell used in the installation ceremony is the original hand 
bell from the Isaac Bear Public School Building that served generations 
of students in Xew Hanover County. In 1947, this building became the 
first home for Wilmington College. After moving to the current 
campus, the historical ties were continued in 1972 when a new 
campus classroom building was named Isaac Bear Hall. 
The bell is part of the historic display in the North Carolina 
Teachers Legac}' Hall in the Education Building. 





UNIVERSITY MEDALLION 

The university medallion, along with academic processionals, 
regalia and the university mace, is a symbol steeped in tradition. 
During the Middle Ages, medallions signified membership in 
religious orders, and in the Renaissance, they were worn by 
members of elite orders of knighthood and high-ranking 
government officers. Today, colleges and universities strike 
medallions to commemorate important events and achievements. 

Symbolic of the highest honor and office of a campus, the medallion 
is to be worn by the chancellor for ceremonial occasions such as 
commencement and convocation. 

This medallion was especially designed for UNCW and Chancellor 
Miller. In an effort to recognize UNCW's traditions and history, the 
bronze medallion features the UNCW seal on the front. The names 
of the previous chancellors and presidents are engraved on the 
back of the medallion to honor them and their service to UNCW. 




UNIVERSITY MACE 

The unixersitN- mace, carried by the chief faculty marshal, incorporates 
elements and materials important to tl^e history of our university and 
region. The boss, or top of the mace, represents the essence of education, 
the flame of learning. It was designed to embody humankind's timeless 
pursuit of knowledge and quest for truth. 

Belo^v the boss are four official seals important to the university's 

histor\-. Thev represent New Hanover County, Wilmington 

College, the University of North Carolina system and the 

UniversitA- of North Carolina Wilmington. Four bands on the 

shaft svmbolize the College of Arts and Sciences, the College of Health 

and Human Ser\dces, the Cameron School of Business, 

and the \Vatson School of Education. 

The terminus, or end piece, consists of a longleaf pinecone to 
svmbolize the longleaf pine tree common to the landscape of 
Southeastern North Carolina. The longleaf pine is also the state tree. 

The mace \vas designed by Jeff Morvil, a Wilmington artist, and 
created b\ Mar\^in Jensen, a sculptor from Penland, NC. 




ACADEMIC REGALIA 



The academic regalia usually recognizes three different degrees: the 
bachelor, the master and the doctor. The name of each degree was 
derived by medieval university custom. The bachelor's degree, or 
baccalaureate, takes its name from the medieval practice of "bach- 
elors" wearing a garland of bayberries. The master's degree was 
equivalent to a license to teach and sometimes was followed by 
the express words "Licentia Docendi." The doctor's degree, when 
earned by study, as is true of the Doctor of Philosophy degree, 
indicates advanced study and independent research in a specialized 
field of learning, whereas honorary degrees are granted for 
meritorious service and for distinction in public or 
private endeavor. 

In the medieval university, students and teachers wore gowns 
indicating their status and scholastic achievement. Those holding a 
bachelor's degree wear a gown of worsted material, fastened at the 
top and distinguished by long pointed sleeves hanging nearly to 
the knees. The master's gown, worn open, has long closed sleeves 
with an arc of a circle appearing near the bottom of a slit for the arm 
near the middle of the sleeves. The doctor's gown, also worn open, 
is faced with a broad strip of velvet and has three bars of velvet on 
each sleeve. 



A hood may be worn with the gown. The bachelor's hood is three feet 
long, with a two-inch strip of velvet; the master's hood is three and 
one-half feet long, faced with a three-inch strip of velvet; the doctor's 
hood is four feet long and faced with a five-inch strip of velvet. The 
color of the tassel or the velvet strip on the hood indicates the field 
of study in which the degree was earned or granted; for example: 
Arts, white; Science, yellow; Education, light blue; Nursing, apricot; 
Business, drab. Each hood is also lined in silk with the colors of the 
institution which granted the degree. UNCW's hood is lined with 
green and gold. 

The appropriate cap for all degrees is the familiar black "mortar- 
board." A black tassel, or one of the colors signifying the field of 
specialization, hanging to the left of the face, is appropriate for all 
degrees. Those holding a doctor's degree may wear a soft velvet cap 
of the color indicating their field of study or, with the "mortarboard," 
they may wear a tassel in whole or in part of gold thread. 



UNrV^ERSITY SEAL 



Although it has e\ohed o\-er the \-ears, the uni\'ersity seal retains 
the triangle as a reference to our roots, adds the pine boughs 
for the longleaf pine indigenous to North Carolina and the 
scroll for a diploma-issuing unixersit}-. A sealiawk appears 
at the top of the pine boughs, and 1947, the date of the 
establisliment of Wilmington College, appears at the bottom. 
UNCW's unique motto, Discere Aude, was created by William 
Madison Randall, the next to the last president of Wilmington 
Collesie. It has been defined as both "Dare to Learn" and 
"In order to discover the truth firsthand, be courageous!" 





ABOUT INSTALLATIONS 



Historic Importance of an Installation 

Historians generally locate the emergence of the methods shaping 
the university concept in Ancient Greece where Socrates espoused 
the value of inquiry and thinking and their importance in attaining a 
"good" and meaningful life. The objective of the Socratic Method was 
to identify questions and methods of inquiry that lead to broad and 
deep understanding and not to simply arrive at an answer. "What is 
beauty?" "What is the right thing to do?" "What is wisdom?" "What 
is piety?" "How can we know when an answer is adequate?" As 
important as what was taught was xohy we should teach, and why 
we should teach the young with special concern and attention. The 
young, the Greeks posited, must learn to think so that they could be 
and remain free. The Greeks believed that knowledge and freedom 
were inseparably linked. 

The origins of modern higher education are best revealed in the 
medieval universities of Europe, beginning in Italy at Salerno (9th 
century) and Bologna (11th century). The word "university" comes 
from the Latin term universitas and means the student body. The 
monastic clergy respected and embraced the conviction of the 
Greeks that freedom is held fast by character, developed by 
discipline and informed by reason and that both of these qualities 
are essential foundations for the young. Those who founded the 



first universities held to the tradition that instruction is best 
delivered by masters who mentor their students by providing both 
information and scholarly example. 

In 1115, the great university of Oxford assembled the priests of the 
Priory of St. Augustine to create a center of learning. Like Oxford, 
Cambridge, founded in 1209, also emerged from the spiritual 
community of the cathedral school. Universities like Villanova, in 
Philadelphia, continue to be administered by clergy and to preserve 
this rich history in the repository of the Augustinian Historical 
Institute on their campus. 

Today's public institutions, while more secular, continue to 
embrace the "life of the mind" and the ethos of intellectual rigor 
and reasoned inquiry. Each installation of a new university leader 
reminds us of this heritage and our obligations to protect freedom 
of thought and inquiry and to pursue "truth and beauty." 

Symbolic Importance of an Installation 

The installation of a chancellor is an important event in the life of 
a university. It is a moment of refletftion and opportunity. With the 
formal charging of a new institutional leader by the President of the 
University of North Carolina, the UNC Board of Governors and 
the UNCW Board of Trustees, a new era is charted in the context 



oi pre\-ailing opportunities and challenges. The newly sworn 
chancellor draws upon tlie ricliness of traditions, past successes of 
the institution and the strength and energy of generations of 
facult^•, staff, students and alumni. The new chancellor pledges 
to preserve the best of the values and traditions of the academy 
while de\-eloping ne^v strategies to address current challenges, to 
accept risks and to pursue opportimities. Thus, each chancellor 
must be of tAvo minds, embracing both tradition and imiovation. 

The s\"mbols and ceremon\- of an installation remind us of the 
profound responsibilit\' of those who are entrusted by the people of 
the state of North Carolina to educate and develop the minds and 
lives of others. While the ceremonv and processions are marked 
b\' artifacts, pageantr\- and inspiring speeches, the university 
communit\" is acuteh' a^vare of its solemn responsibility to preserve 
access and opportunitv for the generations who will follow. The 
mace, regalia, university,' seal and oath of office speak to past and 
future responsibilities of a university dedicated to being a place free 
from bias and bigotr\', a place that calls upon the best in each of us 
to ad\ance knowledge, preserve our natural treasures and elevate 
humanit\'. The university is uniquely positioned to embrace 
diversit\', bring together the voices of consensus and decent 
dissent in a forum of mutual regard and civility. 



At the core of the university's identity and mission are the creation 
and fostering of a collective body, relentlessly committed to the 
pursuit and application of knowledge. The installation of a 
chancellor is a celebration of creative, critical and reflective thinking; 
lifelong learning; excellence in teaching; opportunities for student 
engagement in significant research and discovery; diversity; sound 
environmental stewardship and the development of leaders. 
The installation is a time to celebrate and to proclaim these 
achievements individually and collectively and to renew 
and refresh our commitment to the values they exemplify. 

Personal Importance of an Installation 

In addition to the historic and symbolic importance of the 
installation, the ceremonies and symbols have meaning on a 
personal level. The institution's vision, given voice by the 
chancellor, frames our work and defines in large and small ways 
how the daily routines of the institution shall be aligned to realize 
the beliefs and values of the faculty, staff and students. For members 
of the university community and citizens of the region, an 
installation is intended to foster collegiality and connect the talents 
and energy of the university and the greater community. 

The many events surrounding the installation offer students, faculty 
and staff a unique opportunity to feature exemplary programs and 



display the strengths of the university experience. 
The installation is an opportunity to tell the UNCW 
story to a wide audience and also to link the story 
that is yet to be told to the future of our graduates, 
the region and the state. 

With more than 40 campus events scheduled in 
April 2012, the community will have many 
opportunities to experience a celebration of 
academic excellence, student achievements and 
faculty research and innovation. The campus 
community recognizes that the installation 
ceremony and the accompanying events are 
intended to honor not only the university 
community, but also our many partners who 
are critical to UNCW's future. 

The installation ceremony is a public renewal of the 
university's commitment to honor its obligations to 
its students and the greater community. 




UNCW BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Wilma \V. Daniels 
Wilmintrton, XC 



Carlton H. Fisher '83 
Wilmington, XC 

Kimberh- B. Hill-Ha}den '03 
Raleigh. XC 



C. Phillip Marion Jr. 
^Vilmington, XC 

Ronald B. McNeill 
Wilmington, XC 

Wendv F. Murph^' '93, Secretary 
Wallace, XC 

Linda A. Pearce, Vice Chair 
W'Umington, XC 



Britt A. Preyer 
Greensboro, NC 

Gary K. Shipman '17 
Wilmington, NC 

Michael B. Shivar 
Kinston, NC 

W. David Swain 
Wilmington, NC 

George M. Teague, Chair 
Raleigh, NC 

Keith R. Fraser '13 

President, Student Government Association 

Wilmington, NC 







INSTALLATION COMMITTEE 


CHANCELLOR SEARCH COMMITTEE 


Robert E. Tyndall, Chair 


Wendy F. Murphy '93, Chair 


Cathy J. Albergo 


M. Terry Coffey, Vice Chair 


Maxwell Allen 


Wilma W. Daniels 


David P. Cordle 


Charles D. Evans 


Elizabeth R. Grimes 


Estell C. Lee Harrelson '55 


Jennifer B. Harris '91 


Paul E. Hosier 


Jeren D. Hernandez '13 


Susan H. Ivancevich 


E. Leah Kraus 


Nancy B. Jones 


Charles A. Maimone 


Bruce C. McKinney 


i Georgia N. Miller 


John Albert McNeill Jr. 


Shelley L. Morse 


Linda A. Pearce 


Wendy F. Murphy '93 


Antonio E. Puente 


Matthew D. Rogers 


Michael B. Shivar 


Claire Z. Stanley 


George M. Teague ^ 


Frank P. Trimble 


T. Matthew Victory '11 


Ronald J. Vetter 


Jason T. Wheeler '99, '03M 


Larry A. Wray 





SPECIAL THANKS 

The installation ceremony and events associated 

with the celebration have been made possible 

b}' the efforts and talents of many faculty, staff, 

students, volunteers and friends. We thank all of 

the individuals involved in planning, executing and 

supporting this historic campus occasion. 



\^ 



DARE TO SOAR 



o7^ /Vo^ri^ C^{z^<€^/t^^i€i^ /Pu 





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